49 winners of RIBA National Awards include a war memorial and a Jewish cemetery

Buildings.

15 Clerkenwell Close, London, by Groundwork & Amin Taha Architects (phs: Tim Soar)
““An astonishing architectural triumph… thoroughness and care has gone into every thought and every inch of the project… a truly bespoke, hand-crafted work of art, but one that has a grace and balance, suggesting that the obsession was harnessed rather than letting the madness in. 15 Clerkenwell Close is brave, ambitious, highly innovative and bespoke, where risks have been taken and have paid off, resulting in a truly imaginative, intriguing and astonishing work of architecture.”

Buildings.

25 Savile Row, London, by Piercy & Company (phs: Jack Hobhouse, Hufton & Crow)
“This refurbishment of an art deco office is an exquisitely executed, from the first conceptual move to the finest point of detail. The result is a very beautifully crafted, light and elegant building, in which consistent care and thought have gone into every element throughout the briefing, design and construction processes. A defining, innovative feature was the exploration of digital craft and collaboration between client, architect and artisan. Intensive design and fabrication workshops were held with expert makers from the outset, creating a very beautiful building for the long term, which in an understated way enriches the cityscape.”

Buildings.

53 Great Suffolk Street, London, by Hawkins Brown (phs: Jim Stephenson, Tim Crocker)
“53 Great Suffolk Street is the sensitive refurbishment and extension of a Victorian warehouse that brings 40,000 square feet of much needed workspace to Southwark. The new build extension takes on the language of the existing building, reinterpreting it in a contemporary and confident manner. Every aspect has been carefully considered and the palette of materials enhances and complements the raw nature of the existing warehouse building.”

Buildings.

Bethnal Green Memorial, London, by Arboreal Architecture (phs: Marcela Spadaro, Harry Paticas)
“In 1943, one of the worst civilian disasters in modern British history occurred in what is the access stair to Bethnal Green Underground station. 173 people were crushed and asphyxiated as they rushed to gain shelter during an air raid. In 2006, Harry Paticas, a Bethnal Green architect noticed a plaque that had been discretely fixed to the stair in 1993 quietly acknowledging the deaths. After some research, he felt strongly that a more fitting memorial was needed. The concept is an inversion of the negative space within the stairwell where the crush occurred, lifted up and to one side of the stairwell in the corner of the park. A striking memorial that is part-sculpture, part-architecture and that has intellectual conceptual rigour, a poignant justification for its form, a clear consideration to the viewer’s experience and spatial interaction, a construction and structural complexity, and is built to an impeccable level of finish and detail.”

Buildings.

Bloomberg headquarters, London, by Foster & Partners (phs: Nigel Young, Aaron Hargreaves)
“Occupying a whole block within the city, this project is a large office building to house all of Bloomberg’s employees under one roof for the first time. Internally, the process of moving through the architectural procession and up in the lifts creates a completely immersive environment. The concourse level is very vibrant, buzzing with activity and isolated from its surroundings. Everywhere you look there is an inventive detail, from the bespoke, folded-aluminium ceiling ‘roses’ to the magnetic floorboards. The aim of the building was to avoid standard office space and in this it succeeds. Overall the project is a tour-de-force. This is the opposite of a quiet understated building. In fact the multiplicity of invention at numerous levels is carried through with such conviction that you cannot fail but be impressed by it.”

Buildings.

Gasholders, London, by Wilkinson Eyre with Jonathan Tuckey Design (phs: Peter Landers)
“The industrial heritage of Kings Cross is integral to its regeneration and the triplet of listed cast-iron gasholders is the most distinct centrepiece. Sitting comfortably within these structures are the three residential drums, clad in a delicate and intricate aesthetic of steel and glass panels with a veil of external shutters pierced in a pattern of circles to allow dappled light into the rooms. A successful marrying of old with new, where it sensitively handles the needs of modern living with celebrating the most beautiful industrial structures in the renaissance of King’s Cross.”